He is a member of the South Asia Advisory Board of the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office, of the Academic Board of the Valdai Discussion Club in Russia, for which he writes regular articles on contemporary issues, and of the Board of the Pakistan Institute for Peace Studies (PIPS), Islamabad. He is a peer reviewer for the journal Russia in Global Affairs and other academic publications.

His latest book, Climate Change and the Nation State, was published by Oxford University Press in the USA and Penguin in the UK in the Spring of 2020. An updated paperback edition is appearing in 2021. Anatol Lieven has also been commissioned by Oxford University Press to write another book, with the working title of “Nationalism and Progress in Modern History”, to be completed in 2022.

He has edited, together with Professor Harry Verhoeven, a book of essays on The Global Indian Ocean: States, Societies and Markets Beyond the Liberal Order, to be published by Hurst.

Anatol Lieven’s areas of expertise include the history and contemporary study of nationalisms; the politics of Climate Change action; Realist thought and ethics in International Relations; Islamist militancy and insurgency; the history of jihadi thought and culture; contemporary warfare; US political culture; US strategy; the countries of the former Soviet Union; South Asia; and the Greater Middle East, especially Pakistan, Afghanistan and Iran.

Dr Lieven’s responsibilities at GUQ have included teaching the following courses:

  • Introduction to International Relations;
  • Comparative Political Systems;
  • Nationalism in the Modern World;
  • US Foreign and Security Policy;
  • War and Diplomacy in South Asia and Afghanistan.

He contributes lectures to Professor Clyde Wilcox’s course on “Interstellar Politics: Science Fiction as a Mirror of Modern Political Concerns” (Government 379) and Professor Rogaia Abusharaf’s course on “War and Peace in Darfur” (Anthropology 350). During his time in Qatar, Professor Lieven has also lectured at the Center for International and Regional Studies of GUQ, at the Brookings Doha Center, at Qatar University and at the Qatari General Staff Academy, and was invited to brief H.H. Sheikha Moza prior to a talk by Her Serene Highness at the United Nations.

He is currently developing a new BA course on Insurgency and Counter-Insurgency, which is also intended to be part of a planned MA programme in security studies at Georgetown University in Qatar.

Dr Lieven supervises BA Honors theses at Georgetown in Qatar, sits on the International Politics and International History curricular committees, and previously represented the Qatar campus on the joint committee (with the main SFS campus in Washington DC) on teaching load reform. In 2018-19 he was chair of the Research Committee at Georgetown University in Qatar, with responsibility for assessing research proposals and allocating research funds, and he serves on the faculty liaison committee of the Center for International and Regional Studies, the think tank of Georgetown University in Qatar, where he has given several lectures. During his time as a professor at King’s College London, he successfully supervised five PhDs, and served as an examiner for seven.

Dr Lieven was jointly responsible (with Dr Harry Verhoeven) for convening and organising the SFSQ annual faculty conference on March 20th and 21st 2017, on the theme of “The Liberal State and Its Alternatives in the Indian Ocean World”.

In 2015-2016 he chaired several meetings in Kabul of an Afghanistan-Pakistan “track two” dialogue, entitled “Beyond Boundaries” devoted to improving relations between states in the region. These were sponsored by the British Foreign Office and took place under the auspices of the Regional Security Group. This built on his previous experience at King’s College London of chairing sessions of Track Two dialogues between Indian and Pakistani representatives.

Previous employment:
  • 2007-2014: Chair of International Relations and Terrorism Studies, War Studies Department, King’s College London.
  • 2005-2007: Senior Fellow, New America Foundation, Washington DC.
  • 2000-2005: Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Washington DC.
  • 1998-2000: Senior Fellow, International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), London, UK and editor of the IISS publication “Strategic Comments”.
  • 1997-1998: Central Europe correspondent, Financial Times (based in Budapest, Hungary).
  • 1996-1997: Visiting Fellow, United States Institute of Peace (USIP), Washington DC.
  • 1990-1996: Correspondent for The Times (London) in the Soviet Union and Russia.
  • 1990: Reported on the Romanian Revolution for The Times (London).
  • 1988-1990: Correspondent for The Times (London) in Pakistan and Afghanistan.
  • 1986-1987: Producer/talkswriter for the Topical (news analysis and comment) section of the Eastern Service, BBC External Services, London.
  • 1985-86: Freelance journalist in India.
Academic degrees
  • PhD in Political Science, University of Cambridge, UK, 2004.
  • BA in History (Double First), University of Cambridge, UK, 1982.

Also attended Jawaharlal University, New Delhi, India, as an exchange student, 1982-1983.

Dr Lieven’s taught BA and MA courses at King’s College included the study of contemporary conflicts, South Asian security issues, and cultural approaches to war. He successfully supervised five PhD theses on Afghanistan, Pakistan, urban policing and ethnic conflict, counter-insurgency, environmental security and US strategy, and served as an examiner for six PhD candidates. From 2007 to 2013 he served as head of PhD admissions in the War Studies Department.

While at King’s, Dr Lieven received research grants from the Nuffield Foundation and the British Academy to support his research in Pakistan.

He was responsible at King’s College for convening and organising several workshops, seminars and meetings, including a workshop between British and Russian experts and officials concerning co-operation in combating the heroin trade from Afghanistan, a track two dialogue between retired Indian and Pakistani officials and soldiers and a mini-conference on the future of Afghanistan. From 2010-2013 he lectured to British diplomats headed to South Asia as part of a joint KCL programme with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

During his time at King’s, Dr Lieven also gave briefings on Pakistan, Afghanistan and other issues to the National Security Committee of the British cabinet (including the previous prime minister David Cameron and the present prime minister Theresa May when she was Home Secretary); the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO); the Ministry of Defence (MOD), the Home Office, the Department for International Development (DFID); the Security Service; the National Crime Agency (International Corruption Unit); the UK Defence Academy (Shrivenham); and the Royal Military Academy (Sandhurst). He lectured at the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI), the Royal Institute for International Affairs (Chatham House) and a range of British universities. He has also briefed government officials and departments in France, Germany, Norway, Canada and Australia.

Anatol Lieven has worked as a consultant on the relationship between security, trade, development and international assistance in Afghanistan and South Asia for the World Bank. He has written two research papers for the Bank, one on trade and energy routes through Afghanistan, and a second (with Zahid Hussain) on regional connectivity in South Asia.

His duties at the Carnegie Endowment and the New America Foundation included fund-raising and helping to organise conferences and workshops, including the 10-year anniversary conference of the Carnegie Moscow Center (2003). He gave lectures and briefings on Afghanistan, Pakistan, Islamist extremism, and relations with Russia to a range of US universities and institutes, and to government departments including the State Department, the Department of Defense, the CIA and the Department of Homeland Security.

Anatol Lieven has been a frequent contributor in the past to the Financial Times and the International Herald Tribune. He also writes occasionally for the New York Times, the Times, the Guardian, the Christian Science Monitor and various European publications including Le Monde and Le Figaro. From 2011-2014 he wrote a bimonthly column for American Review, published by the US Studies Centre of the University of Sydney, Australia.

He has written extensively for other journals, including Encounter, International Affairs, Prospect, the New Statesman, The Spectator, the Economist, the World Today and the Tablet in Britain; and Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, the National Interest, the Atlantic Monthly, the Nation, the Washington Quarterly and the New Republic in the US. He has given innumerable interviews on radio and television, and frequently addresses government, military, policy-making and academic bodies and conferences.

Main Publications

Books:
  • Climate Change and the Nation State (Oxford University Press, USA, and Penguin, UK, in March/April 2020).
  • Pakistan: A Hard Country (Oxford University Press, USA, and Penguin, UK, 2011). This book is a study of political power in Pakistan (inspired in part by Michael Mann’s work): who has power, where does it come from, how it is exercised, and what legitimises it. In particular, this book seeks to go beyond the stereotypes of Pakistan as a failing state to explain Pakistan’s surprising resilience as a state and society, and how the sources of this resilience are also responsible for social and economic stagnation. A Chinese edition of this book is planned.
  • Ethical Realism: A Vision for America’s Role in the World, co-authored with John Hulsman, (Pantheon 2006). 
  • America Right or Wrong: An Anatomy of American Nationalism (Oxford University Press, 2004 and 2012). This book analyses American nationalism in the context of nationalism in history and in the contemporary world. This book has also been published in French, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Arabic and Chinese.
  • Ambivalent Neighbors: The EU, NATO and the Price of Membership, co-edited with Dmitri Trenin (Carnegie Endowment 2003). 
  • Ukraine and Russia: A Fraternal Rivalry (US Institute of Peace in 1999). It examines the complex historical, cultural, political and demographic background to the troubled Russian-Ukrainian relationship, and makes recommendations for Western strategy.
  • Chechnya: Tombstone of Russian Power? (Yale University Press 1999). The central part of this book examines the causes and nature of the decline of the Russian state in the 1990s, and the character of Russian nationalism after the fall of the USSR. This book has also been published in a Russian language edition.
  • The Baltic Revolution: Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and the Path to Independence, (Yale University Press 1993). This book won the George Orwell Prize for Political Writing (UK) and the Yale University Press Governors’ Award.
Book Chapters:
  • A chapter on the Afghan Peace Process for a forthcoming book on Peace Processes in Comparative Perspective, edited with an introduction by Professor Roger MacGinty of Manchester University, to be published by Cambridge University Press in 2019.
  • A chapter on “Pakistan’s Counter-Insurgency Victory” in Shanthie D’Souza (ed.), Contemporary Insurgency and Counter-Insurgency, to be published by Routledge in 2019.
  • The chapter “Future of US Foreign Policy” in Michael Cox and Doug Stokes (ed.), US Foreign Policy (Oxford University Press, third edition 2018).
  • “Limiting Migration to Preserve European Social Peace”, in Raffaele Marchetti (ed), Debating Migration to Europe: Welfare versus Identity (Routledge 2017).
  • “West Asia Since 1900: Living Through the Wreck of Empires” in Mehran Kamrava (ed.), The Great Game in West Asia: Turkey, Iran and the South Caucasus (Oxford University Press, Oxford and New York August 2017).
  • “Realism and Progress: Niebuhr’s Thought and Contemporary Challenges”, in Richard Harries (ed), Reinhold Niebuhr and Contemporary Politics: God and Power (Oxford University Press 2010).
  • “International Security and Western Interventionism”, in Making Multilateralism Work, Alasdair Murray (ed), published by Centre Forum (London), 2007.
  • “Lessons of the War in Chechnya” in Soldiers in Cities: Urban Operations on Urban Terrain, Michael C. Desch (ed.), Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, November 2001.
  • “The Cold War is Finally Over: The True Significance of the Attacks,” in How Did This Happen: Terrorism and the New War, James F. Hoge, Jr. and Gideon Rose, eds. (New York: Public Affairs, 2001).
  • “The Nato-Russia Accord: An Illusory Solution” in Nato Enlargement: Illusions and Reality, edited by Ted Galen Carpenter and Barbara Conry (CATO Institute, Washington DC, 1998).
Essays:
  • “How the West Lost”, Prospect magazine (London), August 31st 2020.
  • “Stay Calm About China”, Foreign Policy (Washington DC), August 26th 2020
  • “Can America Remember What It Takes To Survive As A Democracy?”, The National Interest (Washington DC), August 16th 2020.
  • “The Ethic of National Responsibility”, The Point (New York), issue 22, Summer 2020.
  • “The Virus is a Mirror to Existing Societies”, Russia in Global Affairs (Moscow), April 9th 2020.
  • “Climate Change and the State: The Case for Environmental Realism”, Survival (IISS, London), vol.62, issue 2, 2020.
  • “Dance of the Ghosts: A New Cold War with Russia Will Serve No Western Interests”, Survival (IISS, London), vol.60, no.5 September 2018.
  • “Peace in Afghanistan: The Duty of Afghanistan’s Region”, Russia in Global Affairs (Moscow), July 3rd 2018.
  • “The Era of American Stasis”, Russia in Global Affairs (Moscow), January 29th 2018.
  • “Hindu Nationalism: A Reality Check for Liberalism and Globalisation”, Russia in Global Affairs (Moscow), May 23rd 2017.
  • “Pakistan’s Counter-Insurgency Victory: The Role of Legitimacy”, Journal of Small Wars & Insurgencies, Volume 28, no. 1, February 2017. This essay has been published in Italian as “L’ambiente come politica di sicurezza”, Aspenia no.89, 2020.
  • Review essay of Michael Mann, The Sources of Social Power, Volume 4, International Journal of Politics, Culture and Society, vol.29, issue 2, June 2016.
  • “What Chance for Afghanistan?” New York Review of Books, April 21st 2016
  • Ukraine: The Way Out”, New York Review of Books, June 5th 2014.
  • “Face-Off in Ukraine”, Prospect March 14th 2014.
  • “Afghanistan: The Best Way to Peace”, New York Review of Books, vol.59, no.2, February 9th 2012.
  • “The Future of Democracy in America”, Current Intelligence, vol.4, issue 3, summer 2012.
  • “Military Exceptionalism in Pakistan”, Survival (IISS), vol.53 no.4, August-September 2011.
  • “Insights from the Afghan Field”, Current Intelligence, vol. September 6th 2010.
  • “The War in Afghanistan: Its Background and Future Prospects”, Conflict, Security and Development, 9, 3 (2009).
  • “Russia’s Limousine Liberals”, The National Interest (Washington DC) June 10th 2009.
  • “Avoiding a New Cold War”, Mezhdunarodnaya Zhizn (Russia), Summer 2007.
  • “Progressive Realism”, The Boston Review, July/August 2007.
  • Developmental Realism, Harvard Law & Policy Review, January 17th 2007.
  • “Progressive Realism”, The Boston Review, July/August 2007.
  • On Might, Ethics and Realism, The National Interest, November 30, 2006.
  • “US/USSR: Remembering the Cold War”, London Review of Books, November 16 2006.
  • A Difficult Country: Pakistan and the case for Developmental Realism”, The National Interest, May 1st 2006.
  • “Wolfish Wilsonians”, Orbis, April 1st 2006.
  • We Do Not Deserve These People: America and Its Army”, London Review of Books, vol.27, no.20, October 19th, 2005.
  • “Taking Back America: The Right-Wing Backlash”, London Review of Books, vol.26, no.23, December 2nd 2004.
  • “A Trap of Their Own Making: The Consequences of the New Imperialism”, London Review of Books, vol.25, no.9, May 8th 2003.
  • “Preserver and Destroyer: Pakistan’s Predicament”, London Review of Books, vol.25, no.3, January 23rd 2003.
  • “The Push to War”, London Review of Books, vol.24, no.19, October 3rd 2002.
  • “The Pressures on Pakistan”, Foreign Affairs, January/February 2002.
  • “Strategy for Terror”, Prospect magazine (London), October 20th 2001.
  • “The New Cold War” London Review of Books, vol.23, no.19, October 4th 2001. 
  • “Chechnya and the Laws of War”, East European Constitutional Review, Vol. 10, No.2/3, Spring/Summer 2001.
  • “Nasty Little Wars”, The National Interest (Washington DC), December 1st 2000.
  • “British Chill: What E.H.Carr Got Right”, London Review of Books, vol.22, no.16, August 24th 2000.
  • “The Not So Great Game”, The National Interest (Washington DC), December 1st 1999.
  • “Lord Salisbury: A Model for Aspiring Imperialists”, The National Interest (Washington DC), September 1st 1998.
Policy Briefs:
  • “Taliban Perspectives on Reconciliation” (with Theo Farrell, Michael Semple and Rudra Chaudhuri), Royal United Services Institute, September 2012.
  • “US-Russian Relations and the Rise of China”, New America Foundation, July 11th 2011.
  • “Failing States and US Strategy”, Stanley Foundation, September 2006.
  • Policy briefs for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace:
  • “A Spreading Danger: Time for a New Policy Toward Chechnya” (co-authored with Fiona Hill and Tom de Waal), no.35, 2005.
  • “The Hinge to Europe: Don’t Make Britain Choose between the US and Europe”, no.26, 2003.
  • “Rebuilding Afghanistan: Fantasy versus Reality” (co-authored with Marina Ottaway), no.12, 2002.
  • “Fighting Terrorism: Lessons from the Cold War”, no.7, 2001.
  • “Soldiers Before Missiles: Meeting the Challenge from the World’s Streets”, no.4, 2001.
Media:

Anatol Lieven has been a frequent contributor to the Financial Times and the International Herald Tribune. He also writes occasionally for the New York Times, the Times, the Guardian, the Christian Science Monitor and various European publications including Le Monde and Le Figaro. From 2011-2014 he wrote a bimonthly column for American Review, published by the US Studies Centre of the University of Sydney, Australia.

He has written extensively for other journals, including Encounter, International Affairs, Prospect, the New Statesman, The Spectator, the Economist, the World Today and the Tablet in Britain; and Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, the National Interest, the Atlantic Monthly, the Nation, the Washington Quarterly and the New Republic in the US. He has given innumerable interviews on radio and television, and frequently addresses government, military, policy-making and academic bodies and conferences.

Articles for the New York Times:

Why Trump Is Right on Russia – The New York Times, February 14, 2017.

Don’t Fear the Russians – The New York Times, March 17, 2016.

The Key to Crushing ISIS – The New York Times, December 3, 2015. 

Seize Upon the Taliban Split – The New York Times, August 6, 2015.

A Way Out for Ukraine and Russia – The New York Times, September 3, 2014.

Attack Syria, Talk to Iran – The New York Times, September 1, 2013.

China Is Key to America’s Afghan Endgame – The New York Times, May 25, 2011.

The end of the West as we know it? – Opinion – International Herald Tribune, December 28, 2006.

Let’s get real – Editorials & Commentary – International Herald Tribune, October 2, 2006.

Europe’s role: Help Israel abandon its failed strategy – International Herald TribuneAugust 9, 2006.

Anatol Lieven is a member of the South Asia Advisory Board of the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office, of the Academic Board of the Valdai Discussion Club in Russia, for which he writes regular articles on contemporary issues, and of the Board of the Pakistan Institute for Peace Studies (PIPS), Islamabad. He is a peer reviewer for the journal Russia in Global Affairs and other academic publications.

His latest book, Climate Change and the Nation State, was published by Oxford University Press in the USA and Penguin in the UK in the Spring of 2020. An updated paperback edition is appearing in 2021. Anatol Lieven has also been commissioned by Oxford University Press to write another book, with the working title of “Nationalism and Progress in Modern History”, to be completed in 2022.

He has edited, together with Professor Harry Verhoeven, a book of essays on The Global Indian Ocean: States, Societies and Markets Beyond the Liberal Order, to be published by Hurst.

Anatol Lieven’s areas of expertise include the history and contemporary study of nationalisms; the politics of Climate Change action; Realist thought and ethics in International Relations; Islamist militancy and insurgency; the history of jihadi thought and culture; contemporary warfare; US political culture; US strategy; the countries of the former Soviet Union; South Asia; and the Greater Middle East, especially Pakistan, Afghanistan and Iran.

Dr Lieven’s responsibilities at GUQ have included teaching the following courses:

  • Introduction to International Relations;
  • Comparative Political Systems;
  • Nationalism in the Modern World;
  • US Foreign and Security Policy;
  • War and Diplomacy in South Asia and Afghanistan.

He contributes lectures to Professor Clyde Wilcox’s course on “Interstellar Politics: Science Fiction as a Mirror of Modern Political Concerns” (Government 379) and Professor Rogaia Abusharaf’s course on “War and Peace in Darfur” (Anthropology 350). During his time in Qatar, Professor Lieven has also lectured at the Center for International and Regional Studies of GUQ, at the Brookings Doha Center, at Qatar University and at the Qatari General Staff Academy, and was invited to brief H.H. Sheikha Moza prior to a talk by Her Serene Highness at the United Nations.

He is currently developing a new BA course on Insurgency and Counter-Insurgency, which is also intended to be part of a planned MA programme in security studies at Georgetown University in Qatar.

Dr Lieven supervises BA Honors theses at Georgetown in Qatar, sits on the International Politics and International History curricular committees, and previously represented the Qatar campus on the joint committee (with the main SFS campus in Washington DC) on teaching load reform. In 2018-19 he was chair of the Research Committee at Georgetown University in Qatar, with responsibility for assessing research proposals and allocating research funds, and he serves on the faculty liaison committee of the Center for International and Regional Studies, the think tank of Georgetown University in Qatar, where he has given several lectures. During his time as a professor at King’s College London, he successfully supervised five PhDs, and served as an examiner for seven.

Dr Lieven was jointly responsible (with Dr Harry Verhoeven) for convening and organising the SFSQ annual faculty conference on March 20th and 21st 2017, on the theme of “The Liberal State and Its Alternatives in the Indian Ocean World”.

In 2015-2016 he chaired several meetings in Kabul of an Afghanistan-Pakistan “track two” dialogue, entitled “Beyond Boundaries” devoted to improving relations between states in the region. These were sponsored by the British Foreign Office and took place under the auspices of the Regional Security Group. This built on his previous experience at King’s College London of chairing sessions of Track Two dialogues between Indian and Pakistani representatives.

Previous employment:
  • 2007-2014: Chair of International Relations and Terrorism Studies, War Studies Department, King’s College London.
  • 2005-2007: Senior Fellow, New America Foundation, Washington DC.
  • 2000-2005: Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Washington DC.
  • 1998-2000: Senior Fellow, International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), London, UK and editor of the IISS publication “Strategic Comments”.
  • 1997-1998: Central Europe correspondent, Financial Times (based in Budapest, Hungary).
  • 1996-1997: Visiting Fellow, United States Institute of Peace (USIP), Washington DC.
  • 1990-1996: Correspondent for The Times (London) in the Soviet Union and Russia.
  • 1990: Reported on the Romanian Revolution for The Times (London).
  • 1988-1990: Correspondent for The Times (London) in Pakistan and Afghanistan.
  • 1986-1987: Producer/talkswriter for the Topical (news analysis and comment) section of the Eastern Service, BBC External Services, London.
  • 1985-86: Freelance journalist in India.
Academic degrees
  • PhD in Political Science, University of Cambridge, UK, 2004.
  • BA in History (Double First), University of Cambridge, UK, 1982.

Also attended Jawaharlal University, New Delhi, India, as an exchange student, 1982-1983.

Dr Lieven’s taught BA and MA courses at King’s College included the study of contemporary conflicts, South Asian security issues, and cultural approaches to war. He successfully supervised five PhD theses on Afghanistan, Pakistan, urban policing and ethnic conflict, counter-insurgency, environmental security and US strategy, and served as an examiner for six PhD candidates. From 2007 to 2013 he served as head of PhD admissions in the War Studies Department.

While at King’s, Dr Lieven received research grants from the Nuffield Foundation and the British Academy to support his research in Pakistan.

He was responsible at King’s College for convening and organising several workshops, seminars and meetings, including a workshop between British and Russian experts and officials concerning co-operation in combating the heroin trade from Afghanistan, a track two dialogue between retired Indian and Pakistani officials and soldiers and a mini-conference on the future of Afghanistan. From 2010-2013 he lectured to British diplomats headed to South Asia as part of a joint KCL programme with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

During his time at King’s, Dr Lieven also gave briefings on Pakistan, Afghanistan and other issues to the National Security Committee of the British cabinet (including the previous prime minister David Cameron and the present prime minister Theresa May when she was Home Secretary); the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO); the Ministry of Defence (MOD), the Home Office, the Department for International Development (DFID); the Security Service; the National Crime Agency (International Corruption Unit); the UK Defence Academy (Shrivenham); and the Royal Military Academy (Sandhurst). He lectured at the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI), the Royal Institute for International Affairs (Chatham House) and a range of British universities. He has also briefed government officials and departments in France, Germany, Norway, Canada and Australia.

Anatol Lieven has worked as a consultant on the relationship between security, trade, development and international assistance in Afghanistan and South Asia for the World Bank. He has written two research papers for the Bank, one on trade and energy routes through Afghanistan, and a second (with Zahid Hussain) on regional connectivity in South Asia.

His duties at the Carnegie Endowment and the New America Foundation included fund-raising and helping to organise conferences and workshops, including the 10-year anniversary conference of the Carnegie Moscow Center (2003). He gave lectures and briefings on Afghanistan, Pakistan, Islamist extremism, and relations with Russia to a range of US universities and institutes, and to government departments including the State Department, the Department of Defense, the CIA and the Department of Homeland Security.

Anatol Lieven has been a frequent contributor in the past to the Financial Times and the International Herald Tribune. He also writes occasionally for the New York Times, the Times, the Guardian, the Christian Science Monitor and various European publications including Le Monde and Le Figaro. From 2011-2014 he wrote a bimonthly column for American Review, published by the US Studies Centre of the University of Sydney, Australia.

He has written extensively for other journals, including Encounter, International Affairs, Prospect, the New Statesman, The Spectator, the Economist, the World Today and the Tablet in Britain; and Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, the National Interest, the Atlantic Monthly, the Nation, the Washington Quarterly and the New Republic in the US. He has given innumerable interviews on radio and television, and frequently addresses government, military, policy-making and academic bodies and conferences.

Main Publications

Books:
  • Climate Change and the Nation State (Oxford University Press, USA, and Penguin, UK, in March/April 2020).
  • Pakistan: A Hard Country (Oxford University Press, USA, and Penguin, UK, 2011). This book is a study of political power in Pakistan (inspired in part by Michael Mann’s work): who has power, where does it come from, how it is exercised, and what legitimises it. In particular, this book seeks to go beyond the stereotypes of Pakistan as a failing state to explain Pakistan’s surprising resilience as a state and society, and how the sources of this resilience are also responsible for social and economic stagnation. A Chinese edition of this book is planned.
  • Ethical Realism: A Vision for America’s Role in the World, co-authored with John Hulsman, (Pantheon 2006). 
  • America Right or Wrong: An Anatomy of American Nationalism (Oxford University Press, 2004 and 2012). This book analyses American nationalism in the context of nationalism in history and in the contemporary world. This book has also been published in French, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Arabic and Chinese.
  • Ambivalent Neighbors: The EU, NATO and the Price of Membership, co-edited with Dmitri Trenin (Carnegie Endowment 2003). 
  • Ukraine and Russia: A Fraternal Rivalry (US Institute of Peace in 1999). It examines the complex historical, cultural, political and demographic background to the troubled Russian-Ukrainian relationship, and makes recommendations for Western strategy.
  • Chechnya: Tombstone of Russian Power? (Yale University Press 1999). The central part of this book examines the causes and nature of the decline of the Russian state in the 1990s, and the character of Russian nationalism after the fall of the USSR. This book has also been published in a Russian language edition.
  • The Baltic Revolution: Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and the Path to Independence, (Yale University Press 1993). This book won the George Orwell Prize for Political Writing (UK) and the Yale University Press Governors’ Award.
Book Chapters:
  • A chapter on the Afghan Peace Process for a forthcoming book on Peace Processes in Comparative Perspective, edited with an introduction by Professor Roger MacGinty of Manchester University, to be published by Cambridge University Press in 2019.
  • A chapter on “Pakistan’s Counter-Insurgency Victory” in Shanthie D’Souza (ed.), Contemporary Insurgency and Counter-Insurgency, to be published by Routledge in 2019.
  • The chapter “Future of US Foreign Policy” in Michael Cox and Doug Stokes (ed.), US Foreign Policy (Oxford University Press, third edition 2018).
  • “Limiting Migration to Preserve European Social Peace”, in Raffaele Marchetti (ed), Debating Migration to Europe: Welfare versus Identity (Routledge 2017).
  • “West Asia Since 1900: Living Through the Wreck of Empires” in Mehran Kamrava (ed.), The Great Game in West Asia: Turkey, Iran and the South Caucasus (Oxford University Press, Oxford and New York August 2017).
  • “Realism and Progress: Niebuhr’s Thought and Contemporary Challenges”, in Richard Harries (ed), Reinhold Niebuhr and Contemporary Politics: God and Power (Oxford University Press 2010).
  • “International Security and Western Interventionism”, in Making Multilateralism Work, Alasdair Murray (ed), published by Centre Forum (London), 2007.
  • “Lessons of the War in Chechnya” in Soldiers in Cities: Urban Operations on Urban Terrain, Michael C. Desch (ed.), Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, November 2001.
  • “The Cold War is Finally Over: The True Significance of the Attacks,” in How Did This Happen: Terrorism and the New War, James F. Hoge, Jr. and Gideon Rose, eds. (New York: Public Affairs, 2001).
  • “The Nato-Russia Accord: An Illusory Solution” in Nato Enlargement: Illusions and Reality, edited by Ted Galen Carpenter and Barbara Conry (CATO Institute, Washington DC, 1998).
Essays:
  • “How the West Lost”, Prospect magazine (London), August 31st 2020.
  • “Stay Calm About China”, Foreign Policy (Washington DC), August 26th 2020
  • “Can America Remember What It Takes To Survive As A Democracy?”, The National Interest (Washington DC), August 16th 2020.
  • “The Ethic of National Responsibility”, The Point (New York), issue 22, Summer 2020.
  • “The Virus is a Mirror to Existing Societies”, Russia in Global Affairs (Moscow), April 9th 2020.
  • “Climate Change and the State: The Case for Environmental Realism”, Survival (IISS, London), vol.62, issue 2, 2020.
  • “Dance of the Ghosts: A New Cold War with Russia Will Serve No Western Interests”, Survival (IISS, London), vol.60, no.5 September 2018.
  • “Peace in Afghanistan: The Duty of Afghanistan’s Region”, Russia in Global Affairs (Moscow), July 3rd 2018.
  • “The Era of American Stasis”, Russia in Global Affairs (Moscow), January 29th 2018.
  • “Hindu Nationalism: A Reality Check for Liberalism and Globalisation”, Russia in Global Affairs (Moscow), May 23rd 2017.
  • “Pakistan’s Counter-Insurgency Victory: The Role of Legitimacy”, Journal of Small Wars & Insurgencies, Volume 28, no. 1, February 2017. This essay has been published in Italian as “L’ambiente come politica di sicurezza”, Aspenia no.89, 2020.
  • Review essay of Michael Mann, The Sources of Social Power, Volume 4, International Journal of Politics, Culture and Society, vol.29, issue 2, June 2016.
  • “What Chance for Afghanistan?” New York Review of Books, April 21st 2016
  • Ukraine: The Way Out”, New York Review of Books, June 5th 2014.
  • “Face-Off in Ukraine”, Prospect March 14th 2014.
  • “Afghanistan: The Best Way to Peace”, New York Review of Books, vol.59, no.2, February 9th 2012.
  • “The Future of Democracy in America”, Current Intelligence, vol.4, issue 3, summer 2012.
  • “Military Exceptionalism in Pakistan”, Survival (IISS), vol.53 no.4, August-September 2011.
  • “Insights from the Afghan Field”, Current Intelligence, vol. September 6th 2010.
  • “The War in Afghanistan: Its Background and Future Prospects”, Conflict, Security and Development, 9, 3 (2009).
  • “Russia’s Limousine Liberals”, The National Interest (Washington DC) June 10th 2009.
  • “Avoiding a New Cold War”, Mezhdunarodnaya Zhizn (Russia), Summer 2007.
  • “Progressive Realism”, The Boston Review, July/August 2007.
  • Developmental Realism, Harvard Law & Policy Review, January 17th 2007.
  • “Progressive Realism”, The Boston Review, July/August 2007.
  • On Might, Ethics and Realism, The National Interest, November 30, 2006.
  • “US/USSR: Remembering the Cold War”, London Review of Books, November 16 2006.
  • A Difficult Country: Pakistan and the case for Developmental Realism”, The National Interest, May 1st 2006.
  • “Wolfish Wilsonians”, Orbis, April 1st 2006.
  • We Do Not Deserve These People: America and Its Army”, London Review of Books, vol.27, no.20, October 19th, 2005.
  • “Taking Back America: The Right-Wing Backlash”, London Review of Books, vol.26, no.23, December 2nd 2004.
  • “A Trap of Their Own Making: The Consequences of the New Imperialism”, London Review of Books, vol.25, no.9, May 8th 2003.
  • “Preserver and Destroyer: Pakistan’s Predicament”, London Review of Books, vol.25, no.3, January 23rd 2003.
  • “The Push to War”, London Review of Books, vol.24, no.19, October 3rd 2002.
  • “The Pressures on Pakistan”, Foreign Affairs, January/February 2002.
  • “Strategy for Terror”, Prospect magazine (London), October 20th 2001.
  • “The New Cold War” London Review of Books, vol.23, no.19, October 4th 2001. 
  • “Chechnya and the Laws of War”, East European Constitutional Review, Vol. 10, No.2/3, Spring/Summer 2001.
  • “Nasty Little Wars”, The National Interest (Washington DC), December 1st 2000.
  • “British Chill: What E.H.Carr Got Right”, London Review of Books, vol.22, no.16, August 24th 2000.
  • “The Not So Great Game”, The National Interest (Washington DC), December 1st 1999.
  • “Lord Salisbury: A Model for Aspiring Imperialists”, The National Interest (Washington DC), September 1st 1998.
Policy Briefs:
  • “Taliban Perspectives on Reconciliation” (with Theo Farrell, Michael Semple and Rudra Chaudhuri), Royal United Services Institute, September 2012.
  • “US-Russian Relations and the Rise of China”, New America Foundation, July 11th 2011.
  • “Failing States and US Strategy”, Stanley Foundation, September 2006.
  • Policy briefs for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace:
  • “A Spreading Danger: Time for a New Policy Toward Chechnya” (co-authored with Fiona Hill and Tom de Waal), no.35, 2005.
  • “The Hinge to Europe: Don’t Make Britain Choose between the US and Europe”, no.26, 2003.
  • “Rebuilding Afghanistan: Fantasy versus Reality” (co-authored with Marina Ottaway), no.12, 2002.
  • “Fighting Terrorism: Lessons from the Cold War”, no.7, 2001.
  • “Soldiers Before Missiles: Meeting the Challenge from the World’s Streets”, no.4, 2001.
Media:

Anatol Lieven has been a frequent contributor to the Financial Times and the International Herald Tribune. He also writes occasionally for the New York Times, the Times, the Guardian, the Christian Science Monitor and various European publications including Le Monde and Le Figaro. From 2011-2014 he wrote a bimonthly column for American Review, published by the US Studies Centre of the University of Sydney, Australia.

He has written extensively for other journals, including Encounter, International Affairs, Prospect, the New Statesman, The Spectator, the Economist, the World Today and the Tablet in Britain; and Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, the National Interest, the Atlantic Monthly, the Nation, the Washington Quarterly and the New Republic in the US. He has given innumerable interviews on radio and television, and frequently addresses government, military, policy-making and academic bodies and conferences.

Articles for the New York Times:

Why Trump Is Right on Russia – The New York Times, February 14, 2017.

Don’t Fear the Russians – The New York Times, March 17, 2016.

The Key to Crushing ISIS – The New York Times, December 3, 2015. 

Seize Upon the Taliban Split – The New York Times, August 6, 2015.

A Way Out for Ukraine and Russia – The New York Times, September 3, 2014.

Attack Syria, Talk to Iran – The New York Times, September 1, 2013.

China Is Key to America’s Afghan Endgame – The New York Times, May 25, 2011.

The end of the West as we know it? – Opinion – International Herald Tribune, December 28, 2006.

Let’s get real – Editorials & Commentary – International Herald Tribune, October 2, 2006.

Europe’s role: Help Israel abandon its failed strategy – International Herald TribuneAugust 9, 2006.